Graduate researchers

  • Finding Information
  • Supporting your grant
  • Managing information and data
    • Managing Data @Melbourne is the University's research data management training program. It consists of six short modules, which outline the fundamental practices of good data management. Develop the skills you need to draft your research data management plan. Access the program here.
    • Reference management programs can be used to organise references and associated notes and articles, and to generate a bibliography in a variety of referencing styles. See the Library's Research Guide on reference management tools for more information and support guides. Information on Reference Management training can be found on the Library Research Training page.
    • Licensed software includes: EndNote and RefWorks.
    • Statistical tools: The Library's Statistical and Mathematical Software Guide provides information to the University of Melbourne community on where to access quantitative and qualitative research data analysis software on campus; how to purchase licensed copies; training opportunities; links to support materials and selected library reference books.
    • The Digital Scholarship Program is part of the Library and includes the University Digitisation Centre (UDC) and a variety of specialised research data services. We provide research data management support, data curation and digital forensics services, digital asset management and preservation advice, analogue/digital format conversion advice, 2D and 3D digitisation, as well as advice with digitisation equipment selection, technical support and out-sourcing options.
  • Publishing and sharing
    • Publishing your doctoral research is crucial to building your profile as a researcher. The Library's Getting Published Guide provides an overview of the tools and services available to help you to publish strategically. We also run classes on Research Impact and Publishing - see the Library Research Training page for details.
    • Which journals should you target? Journal directories such as Cabell's, PubsHub and Ulrich's can help.
    • Consider setting up researcher identifiers, such as an ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID), to link all your publications and create a visible online presence. See our Researcher Profiles Guide for more information.
    • The University Copyright Office can provide advice on copyright issues relating to your thesis and other research publications. They also provide advice on the making the digital copy of your thesis Open Access.
  • Measuring impact
    • The Library's Research Impact Guide provides an introduction on how to measure the impact of published research, including your own.
    • Who is citing whom? Citation databases such as Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar can help you map out research trends and identify high-impact publications. Find out more.
    • As an early-career researcher, consider setting up profiles such as ORCID, ResearcherID, Scopus Author Identifier, and a Google Scholar profile, to ensure that your publications are grouped together and easily identified and properly attributed. Read more about researcher profiles on our Library Research Guide.
  • Preserving and archiving
    • Digital Thesis Submission: The Graduate Research Hub provides more information on how to submit a digital copy of your higher degree thesis.
    • Research Data Management: Good research data management practice enables researchers to conduct their research more efficiently, offers greater opportunities for sharing and reusing the research data and allows for better management of research resources. The University Library provides an online training program for graduate researchers in research data management (MANTRA). Find out more and sign-up.